Blog

Ironman Doesn't Make You Slow

Talking to other athletes (pro and amateur) and poking around on message boards, one of the most common things I hear when it comes to Ironman training is people saying “I don’t want to train for Ironman because it will make me slow.” This statement drives me crazy, and it’s time to rant about it…
Read Full Story

The "Stuff" You Need"

I’ve spent half of my life in endurance sports, from Cross Country Running, to Road cycling, to all distance of triathlon, and everything (well, most things) in between. In all facets of these sports, we often get caught up in the results – our outcome-based goals – and try to force our way through training in order to get to that desired result. Beyond the training, however, there are a few other key characteristics and traits that we need to possess for us to truly approach the desired outcome. These are things that folks at all levels require – from spin-class enthusiast to IRONMAN athlete – in order to properly tackle their fitness dreams.
Read Full Story

Something About a Forest and Its Trees

We bought a studio! Sorry, let me rephrase…QT2 Systems, LLC bought a studio! A cycling studio. Ok, so I’m a little late with this. We bought it a year ago. It is exactly what we always wanted to do, but simply never saw as a feasible option, because the start-up costs would be such a tremendous obstacle. Well, sometimes feasibility has a way of working itself out. Somebody builds it out, exactly as you would have wanted it, creates a business around it, runs it, and then comes to a point where life simply takes them in a different direction than originally planned. That’s pretty much how we found ourselves with a studio.
Read Full Story

Adding Light to the Dark Side of Ironman

Ironman training and racing can bring with it, a dark side, and bright side. Both a beginner, and seasoned veteran, should be aware of both. The demands of Ironman changes lives, but it is the responsibly of coach and athlete, to ensure the change is going to make the life during and after Ironman healthy. The health of the athlete should be physical, but also mentally and socially. There will be a time, when swim/bike/run will not be part of the prescription for the day. Hopefully, this isn’t during a training block, but it ultimately will be a prescription someday once the athlete moves on from the Ironman lifestyle. As I navigated through my own racing career, and continue to navigate life without Ironman training in it, the bright and dark lessons learned along the way have become clear. I move athletes through training to gain faster splits, but also pay close attention to the impact this training has on the circle of life that surrounds them.
Read Full Story

Mastering The Open Water Swim

Whether you are an aspiring open water competitor or a triathlete, open water swimming can be an intimidating skill to conquer. Unlike the pool, open water can have varying conditions (think glassy smooth to whitecap chop) and poor visibility. Add to that a few hundred swimmers around you, and it’s no wonder even elite pool swimmers can struggle in open water. Read on for some tips to help you master the skills of open water swimming.
Read Full Story

Strength Training Phases

Triathletes talk (a lot!) about swim-bike-run training. That can depend on coaching philosophy and individual training protocol. There is no one set periodization that should be followed for all individuals. A big mistake I see a lot of athletes (particularly with the bitter winters of the north east) do is scale back over the winter and arrive in April with a blank slate, scrambling to get fit for their first race in June. The problem with this is they have no foundation or groundwork to work upon to increase fitness safely without getting injured. April is too late to try and build a base to gain fitness from, work on skill development and spend time getting their race fueling protocol, bike fit, run shoes, wetsuit etc. in racing form.
Read Full Story

Keeping Your Hip Flexors Happy!

Imagine this scenario. You are in your final weeks of preparation for your A race - a 70.3 distance triathlon. This weekend, your Saturday ride is a preview of the bike course at race intensity followed by a short brick run. The race is a three hour drive from your house, and so you wake up and immediately hit the road. You get out of car and jump on your bike. You start easy for the first 10 minutes and then settle into your race pace. You finish the ride feeling good, grab your running shoes and set off for a quick 20 minute run. You are feeling strong, so you decide to kick it hard at the end. Training is done and so you hop in your car and make the three hour drive home, reflecting positively on how good your fitness is. That evening, you are feeling a little tightness in your hip flexors, the group of muscles which connect your upper legs to your lower back, hips and groin. You figure you’re just tired from the day and don’t think much of it. Off to bed for another day. You wake up a bit more stiff, but figure it will work it’s way out and so you set off on your session for the day - a 10 mile run with race-pace intervals. No time for a warm-up, you just start running. At the beginning of the run, you are feeling some pain in your upper legs and groin area, but it seems to ease up as the run goes, so you do the workout as planned and all seems ok. You head home and decide to rest, sitting on the couch. Then it happens, you go to stand up and feel a sharp pain in your hip and upper leg. You try to walk and the pain worsens. You can’t walk without a limp. Lifting your knee to your chest is difficult. You can’t hop on that leg. Now you are in a panic - what just happened????
Read Full Story

Manage Self Doubt. Don't Let It Manage You.

Self doubt can be an athlete’s worst nightmare. It can impact your workouts, keep you up at night, and taunt you on race day. At some point, all athletes will experience some form of self doubt in their career, and it's important to learn to fight these feelings so they don't debilitate us. As I always say, mental toughness isn't something athletes are born with it's something they learn over time and something there is ALWAYS room for growth in. Below are some tips when you are experiencing self doubt.
Read Full Story

Making the Runner-to-Triathlete Transition

One of the things that make triathlon so interesting is the diversity of the athletes who come to the sport. Triathlon can be thought of as the “melting pot” of all sport. There is not one athletic background that can “make” a triathlete. An advanced swimmer, cyclist, or runner, may have some advantage starting up in the sport, but the training approach, as well as the mental outlook, of what made them an advanced athlete in that sole sport, may have to be adjusted, once initiating triathlon training.
Read Full Story

Translating Pool Fitness Into Open Water Success

We swim countless miles, staring at a black line, going back-and forth, back-and-forth, with lane lines on either side of us. And then we go and race, and gone is the black line. Gone are the walls, every 25 seconds. Gone are the lane lines that keep us on path. Gone is crystal clear water. Oh, and now there are what feels like, a few thousand people surrounding us, trying to occupy the same space! YIKES!
Read Full Story
Talking to other athletes (pro and amateur) and poking around on message boards, one of the most common things I hear when it comes to Ironman training is people saying “I don’t want to train for Ironman because it will make me slow.” This statement drives me crazy, and it’s time to rant about it…
I’ve spent half of my life in endurance sports, from Cross Country Running, to Road cycling, to all distance of triathlon, and everything (well, most things) in between. In all facets of these sports, we often get caught up in the results – our outcome-based goals – and try to force our way through training in order to get to that desired result. Beyond the training, however, there are a few other key characteristics and traits that we need to possess for us to truly approach the desired outcome. These are things that folks at all levels require – from spin-class enthusiast to IRONMAN athlete – in order to properly tackle their fitness dreams.
We bought a studio! Sorry, let me rephrase…QT2 Systems, LLC bought a studio! A cycling studio. Ok, so I’m a little late with this. We bought it a year ago. It is exactly what we always wanted to do, but simply never saw as a feasible option, because the start-up costs would be such a tremendous obstacle. Well, sometimes feasibility has a way of working itself out. Somebody builds it out, exactly as you would have wanted it, creates a business around it, runs it, and then comes to a point where life simply takes them in a different direction than originally planned. That’s pretty much how we found ourselves with a studio.
Ironman training and racing can bring with it, a dark side, and bright side. Both a beginner, and seasoned veteran, should be aware of both. The demands of Ironman changes lives, but it is the responsibly of coach and athlete, to ensure the change is going to make the life during and after Ironman healthy. The health of the athlete should be physical, but also mentally and socially. There will be a time, when swim/bike/run will not be part of the prescription for the day. Hopefully, this isn’t during a training block, but it ultimately will be a prescription someday once the athlete moves on from the Ironman lifestyle. As I navigated through my own racing career, and continue to navigate life without Ironman training in it, the bright and dark lessons learned along the way have become clear. I move athletes through training to gain faster splits, but also pay close attention to the impact this training has on the circle of life that surrounds them.
Whether you are an aspiring open water competitor or a triathlete, open water swimming can be an intimidating skill to conquer. Unlike the pool, open water can have varying conditions (think glassy smooth to whitecap chop) and poor visibility. Add to that a few hundred swimmers around you, and it’s no wonder even elite pool swimmers can struggle in open water. Read on for some tips to help you master the skills of open water swimming.
Triathletes talk (a lot!) about swim-bike-run training. That can depend on coaching philosophy and individual training protocol. There is no one set periodization that should be followed for all individuals. A big mistake I see a lot of athletes (particularly with the bitter winters of the north east) do is scale back over the winter and arrive in April with a blank slate, scrambling to get fit for their first race in June. The problem with this is they have no foundation or groundwork to work upon to increase fitness safely without getting injured. April is too late to try and build a base to gain fitness from, work on skill development and spend time getting their race fueling protocol, bike fit, run shoes, wetsuit etc. in racing form.
Imagine this scenario. You are in your final weeks of preparation for your A race - a 70.3 distance triathlon. This weekend, your Saturday ride is a preview of the bike course at race intensity followed by a short brick run. The race is a three hour drive from your house, and so you wake up and immediately hit the road. You get out of car and jump on your bike. You start easy for the first 10 minutes and then settle into your race pace. You finish the ride feeling good, grab your running shoes and set off for a quick 20 minute run. You are feeling strong, so you decide to kick it hard at the end. Training is done and so you hop in your car and make the three hour drive home, reflecting positively on how good your fitness is. That evening, you are feeling a little tightness in your hip flexors, the group of muscles which connect your upper legs to your lower back, hips and groin. You figure you’re just tired from the day and don’t think much of it. Off to bed for another day. You wake up a bit more stiff, but figure it will work it’s way out and so you set off on your session for the day - a 10 mile run with race-pace intervals. No time for a warm-up, you just start running. At the beginning of the run, you are feeling some pain in your upper legs and groin area, but it seems to ease up as the run goes, so you do the workout as planned and all seems ok. You head home and decide to rest, sitting on the couch. Then it happens, you go to stand up and feel a sharp pain in your hip and upper leg. You try to walk and the pain worsens. You can’t walk without a limp. Lifting your knee to your chest is difficult. You can’t hop on that leg. Now you are in a panic - what just happened????
Self doubt can be an athlete’s worst nightmare. It can impact your workouts, keep you up at night, and taunt you on race day. At some point, all athletes will experience some form of self doubt in their career, and it's important to learn to fight these feelings so they don't debilitate us. As I always say, mental toughness isn't something athletes are born with it's something they learn over time and something there is ALWAYS room for growth in. Below are some tips when you are experiencing self doubt.
One of the things that make triathlon so interesting is the diversity of the athletes who come to the sport. Triathlon can be thought of as the “melting pot” of all sport. There is not one athletic background that can “make” a triathlete. An advanced swimmer, cyclist, or runner, may have some advantage starting up in the sport, but the training approach, as well as the mental outlook, of what made them an advanced athlete in that sole sport, may have to be adjusted, once initiating triathlon training.
We swim countless miles, staring at a black line, going back-and forth, back-and-forth, with lane lines on either side of us. And then we go and race, and gone is the black line. Gone are the walls, every 25 seconds. Gone are the lane lines that keep us on path. Gone is crystal clear water. Oh, and now there are what feels like, a few thousand people surrounding us, trying to occupy the same space! YIKES!

Indoor Cycle, BARRE, & TRX-Strength Pricing
  • 10 Classes
  • $135
  • $13.50/class
  • No Expiration!
  • Get started
  • 20 Classes
  • $239
  • $11.95/class
  • No Expiration!
  • Get started
  • Unlimited
  • $99/mo
  • Less Than $7/class
  • Auto-renew
  • FREE Playroom
  • Get started
  • 12 Classes
  • $89/mo
  • $7.42/class
  • Auto-renew
  • FREE Playroom
  • Get started
  • 8 Classes
  • $69/mo
  • $8.63/class
  • Auto-renew
  • FREE Playroom
  • Get started
Computrainer Performance Cycling
  • 10 Classes
  • $184
  • $18.40/class
  • No Expiration!
  • Get started
  • 20 Classes
  • $319
  • $15.95/class
  • No Expiration!
  • Get started
  • Unlimited
  • $144/mo
  • Less Than $10/class!
  • Auto-renew
  • Comes with TRX!
  • Get started
  • 12 Classes/mo
  • $129/mo
  • $10.75/class
  • Auto-renew
  • Get started
  • 8 Classes/mo
  • $94/mo
  • $11.75/class
  • Auto-renew
  • Get started
Personal Training
  • 4 Sessions/mo
  • $208/mo
  • $52/session
  • Auto-renew
  • Get started
  • Doubles Session
  • $39
  • $39/session
  • 1 Hour Session With One Other Person!
  • Get started
  • Triples Session
  • $34
  • $34/session
  • 1 Hour Session With Two Other People!
  • Get started

Not ready to purchase?  Grab a FREE class to try us out!  Just fill out the form below and we'll send you the details to take advantage of your class NOW.